Cross Check Flatbar


Behold the Flat Bar Cross-Check: a different take on an old favorite, and a go-to for those seeking solid two-wheel, non-motorized transport. It’s still the same Surly Cross-Check frame that has reliably carried people from here to there for decades, only with a spec that moves it deeper into the category of practical transportation. The Cross-Check frame is constructed of size specific 4130 CroMoly ‘Natch tubing and adorned with a simple and straight forward build kit comprised of SRAM X5 components, tough Alex rims, and the do-it-all Knard 41 tire.

Instead of the standard drop bar, there’s a comfy flat bar with a 27-degree sweep to keep you sitting pretty, and an MSW Pork Chop rear rack to carry you and all of your stuff with the greatest of ease. This bike keeps the price tag low and the usefulness high. That way, you’ll have some cash leftover just in case you want to stop for a happy hour on the way home from work.



So what is this Straggler anyway? The easy answer is to say that Surly added disc brakes to a Cross-Check and this is close to accurate.

The most obvious difference of course is that the Straggler has disc caliper mounts instead of rim brake studs. It’ll accept rotors up to 160mm. The rear dropouts are unique, too. They’re a partially closed horizontal design that accommodates singlespeed or geared drivetrains. They feature stop screws that thread in from the rear to further secure the wheel and to position the rear wheel for optimal shifting, plus a forward-mounted stop screw on the drive side to keep the wheel from slipping forward under the force of your gargantuan legs. The rear dropouts are spaced 135mm instead of 132.5mm like the Cross-Check simply because there are far more options for disc hubs in this spacing.

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Straggler shares all of the Cross-Check’s braze-ons for fenders, racks and bottle cages. The Straggler’s geometry is slightly different, with angles and tube lengths very close but not identical to the Cross-Check, but like the Cross-Check it’s ready to take you just about anywhere. It’s a day tripper and a weekender. It’s a ‘rough road’ road bike. It’s a cyclocross bike with no pretense about racing. It’s a utilitarian townie. It’s a light-duty touring bike. It’s an all-weather commuter. And when you get tired of one set up, you can swap parts around and turn it into something else. We think that’s pretty neat.

Karate Monkey 27.5+


Years ago the Karate Monkey helped start the 29” wheel movement and, as time’s gone by, many companies ­– Surly included – have experimented with even more wheel sizes.

With so many different types and sizes of tires now on the market, riders have begun to understand the effect that tire width has on overall wheel diameter, and with ample tire clearance, you can see the benefits of multiple wheel sizes all on one bike. 27+ tires have the same rolling diameter as a 29” wheel, yet you get all the traction and floatation benefits of extra-wide knobbies. And that’s just the tires.

The Karate Monkey frame has recently gotten a make over that includes the addition of features like internal dropper post routing, a new tubeset that uses the same trumpet tubes found on our Instigator 2.0, and a slight tweak in geometry that is more progressive and trail-oriented. The Karate Monkey uses a horizontal dropout with a derailleur hanger that features Gnot-Boost spacing, which gives the rider the ability to run any kind of mountain bike hub they choose. 10 x 135mm QR, 12 x 142, or 12 x 148 Boost™ will all work in the Karate Monkey frame. The frame uses a 44mm headtube for broad fork compatibility and is ED coated for an added layer of internal protection. If, at any point, you decide you want to throw on some skinny meats, standard 29” wheels and tires can be swapped in with no issue. If you want to round-house kick some trail right in the face, the Karate Monkey is your sled.

+ Surly Karate Monkey 29